DID YOU KNOW?

Cervical cancer is treatable when caught early, yet...

1 in 4

women in the US are not up-to-date on their screening - putting them at risk of developing cervical cancer. This is due to many factors, including limited access, time, and discomfort with the current experience.

This January, help us

close the screening gap

We are at 80% of our 1,000 goal!

📣 Follow us on Instagram at @teal.health and share a #closethescreeninggap post and...
Teal Health will donate a cervical cancer screening* on behalf of the first 1,000 shares.
Follow & Share on Instagram
*Patient eligibility required.

Who should get screened?

Women and people with a cervix between the ages of 25-65.

How often should you screen?

According to the American Cancer Society:
If history of normal results^
Pap smear
3 years
Co-test (Pap smear & HPV test)
5 years
^ If your results are abnormal, it is recommended you connect with a provider to discuss whether additional testing is needed and what your screening schedule should be.

Make history with Teal Health

Today, in the US, cervical cancer screenings are performed in-clinic by a provider, 
but self-collect methods are being tested now (more on that below).

Learn the

and feature history of

cervical cancer screenings

1870s
The modern speculum was invented

James Marion Sims, the very controversial “father of gynecology”, is credited with inventing the modern speculum. However, this type of mechanism dates back to at least the Roman Empire.

2020

American Cancer Society endorses primary HPV test as the preferred screening test for cervical cancer

1951
Henrietta Lacks cells (HeLa cells)

Before a young African–American woman named Henrietta Lacks died from aggressive cervical cancer in 1951, clinicians extracted a slice of her cervical tissue - without her consent. These cells reproduced themselves countless times and the “immortal” HeLa cells have contributed to countless medical breakthroughs over the decades and are said to have saved more than 10 million lives.

2006
HPV vaccine becomes available

for children and teens and later extended to adult years. HPV vaccines are close to 100% effective for the prevention of persistent HPV infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

1941
The Pap smear (Papanicolaou smear) test was introduced

Named after the inventor, George Papanicolaou. At the time, it was a game changer. It was the first effort to detect early cancer. Before 1941, cervical cancer was the leading cause of cancer related death among women in the US.

1980s

Discovery that HPV (Human papillomavirus) causes more than 90% of cervical cancers

1990s

Due to screening, it’s reported that cervical cancer incidence, and mortality in the US has declined significantly since the 1950's by more than 70%

2014
FDA approved the first test using HPV as the primary screen for cervical cancer

Until recently, Pap smears were the only test for cervical cancer. The HPV test is still performed similarly (with a speculum), but the difference is in how the sample is tested. The HPV test, which is a more sensitive screen for cervical cancer than the Pap smear, looks for the presence of the virus, not abnormal cells.

Nov. 17, 2020
Cervical Cancer Elimination Day of Action

WHO (World Health Organization), along with all 194 members, announce a global strategy to accelerate the elimination of cervical cancer as a public health problem. Australia has vowed to become the first country in the world to do so, by 2035. Canada and England have pledged to do the same by 2040.

Feb. 2022
Cancer Moonshot to End Cancer

The Biden-Harris administration reignites this initiative and set a goal of reducing cancer death rate by at least 50% over the next 25 years. Including a specific call to action to help ensure equitable access to screening and prevention through at-home, self-collect methods.

July 2022
Self-collect becomes available for all Australians

Self-collect first became available in Australia in 2017, but was restricted to under-screened individuals. By introducing self-collect, Australia has seen the screening rates for cervical cancer rise and death rates drop. Australia aims to eradicate cervical cancer by 2035. That’s the next 10 years!

2014-2018
Pelvic exams deemed unnecessary

In 2014, the American College of Physicians argued that pelvic exams are not necessary for non-pregnant women who are not experiencing any problems. In 2018, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published similar recommendations.

2021
National Cancer Institute Cervical Cancer "Last Mile Initiative"

Over half of the cervical cancer cases in the US are among women who have been never screened or are infrequently screened, and who do not participate in routine screening. This initiative is to help accelerate the approval of self-sampling for HPV testing. This will provide an alternative screening approach for people who do not or cannot access a clinic‐based, speculum exam for cervical cancer screening

1870s
The modern speculum was invented

James Marion Sims, the very controversial “father of gynecology”, is credited with inventing the modern speculum. However, this type of mechanism dates back to at least the Roman Empire.

1941
The Pap smear (Papanicolaou smear) test was introduced

Named after the inventor, George Papanicolaou. At the time, it was a game changer. It was the first effort to detect early cancer. Before 1941, cervical cancer was the leading cause of cancer related death among women in the US.

1951
Henrietta Lacks cells (HeLa cells)

Before a young African–American woman named Henrietta Lacks died from aggressive cervical cancer in 1951, clinicians extracted a slice of her cervical tissue - without her consent. These cells reproduced themselves countless times and the “immortal” HeLa cells have contributed to countless medical breakthroughs over the decades and are said to have saved more than 10 million lives.

1980s

Discovery that HPV (Human papillomavirus) causes more than 90% of cervical cancers

1990s
The Pap smear (Papanicolaou smear) test was introduced

Due to screening, it’s reported that cervical cancer incidence, and mortality in the US has declined significantly since the 1950's by more than 70%

2006
HPV vaccine becomes available

for children and teens and later extended to adult years. HPV vaccines are close to 100% effective for the prevention of persistent HPV infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

2014
FDA approved the first test using HPV as the primary screen for cervical cancer

Until recently, Pap smears were the only test for cervical cancer. The HPV test is still performed similarly (with a speculum), but the difference is in how the sample is tested. The HPV test, which is a more sensitive screen for cervical cancer than the Pap smear, looks for the presence of the virus, not abnormal cells.

2014-2018
Pelvic exams deemed unnecessary

In 2014, the American College of Physicians argued that pelvic exams are not necessary for non-pregnant women who are not experiencing any problems. In 2018, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published similar recommendations.

2020

American Cancer Society endorses primary HPV test as the preferred screening test for cervical cancer

Nov. 17, 2020
Cervical Cancer Elimination Day of Action

WHO (World Health Organization), along with all 194 members, announce a global strategy to accelerate the elimination of cervical cancer as a public health problem. Australia has vowed to become the first country in the world to do so, by 2035. Canada and England have pledged to do the same by 2040.

2021
National Cancer Institute Cervical Cancer "Last Mile Initiative"

Over half of the cervical cancer cases in the US are among women who have been never screened or are infrequently screened, and who do not participate in routine screening. This initiative is to help accelerate the approval of self-sampling for HPV testing. This will provide an alternative screening approach for people who do not or cannot access a clinic‐based, speculum exam for cervical cancer screening

Feb. 2022
Cancer Moonshot to End Cancer

The Biden-Harris administration reignites this initiative and set a goal of reducing cancer death rate by at least 50% over the next 25 years. Including a specific call to action to help ensure equitable access to screening and prevention through at-home, self-collect methods.

July 2022
Self-collect becomes available for all Australians

Self-collect first became available in Australia in 2017, but was restricted to under-screened individuals. By introducing self-collect, Australia has seen the screening rates for cervical cancer rise and death rates drop. Australia aims to eradicate cervical cancer by 2035. That’s the next 10 years!

2024 and beyond

Time to put women in control of their screening experience. 150+ years later and the same speculum is being used in clinics in the US to perform Pap smears and HPV tests.

But not much longer! Self-collect, including Teal’s Wand†, are in clinical trials to support FDA 
review and approval in the US and improve access to this life-saving screening.

Join Waitlist to be alerted when it’s available.

Together, we can get there

🔬 CLINICAL STUDY

Teal Health Partners with Leading Health Organizations in a Nationwide Clinical Trial for their Self-Collect Device for Cervical Cancer Screening, the Teal Wand™

Stay Informed

Learn more about cervical cancer screening, HPV and the brave women sharing their cancer stories